Friday, 15 September 2017

Manitoulin District Cenotaph

 
 
Location:  Manitoulin Island     N 45 42.782   W 82 14.778
At the corner of Highway 551 and Monument Road.
 



This memorial is part of a larger complex known as Memorial Corners, consisting of several memorials, including the Manitoulin District Cenotaph, the Merchant Navy Memorial and the Manitoulin Women’s Memorial.   The grounds are tastefully laid out with room for parking, picnic tables and pathways to each memorial.
The Manitoulin District Cenotaph was originally unveiled in September 1921, consisting of a statue on top of a black granite stele, with the names of four local men lost in the Great War, and later the names of four more men lost in the Second World War.  Sadly, this memorial was destroyed in the early 1960’s in an automobile accident.
In 1994, a new cenotaph was unveiled, using the remains of the original monument and featuring the names of 128 fallen men from the local communities and seven Native Reserves.  The legion branches in Little Current and Gore Bay where the driving force behind the new cenotaph, and along with land donated for the project by George White and Bert Hill, the communities of Manitoulin Island have a memorial to be proud of.  Recent upgrades to the cenotaph have been completed, making it even more appealing and respectful to all those whose names appear on these memorials.
See this link for further details:  https://www.cdli.ca/monuments/on/manitou.htm
 


Marker text:
MANITOULIN DISTRICT CENOTAPH
(Legion Crest)
177 LITTLE CURRENT
514 GORE BAY

NAVY     ARMY     AIR FORCE

“HONOUR LIBERTY THAT
THEY NOT DIE IN VAIN”

IN FLANDERS FIELDS
IN FLANDERS FIELDS THE POPPIES BLOW
BETWEEN THE CROSSES, ROW ON ROW
THAT MARK OUR PLACE;  AND IN THE SKY
THE LARKS, STILL BRAVELY SINGING, FLY
SCARCE HEARD AMID THE GUNS BELOW.

WE ARE THE DEAD, SHORT DAYS AGO
WE LIVED, FELT DAWN, SAW SUNSET GLOW,
LOVED AND WERE LOVED, AND NOW WE LIE
IN FLANDERS FIELDS.

TAKE UP THE QUARREL WITH THE FOE;
TO YOU FROM FAILING HANDS WE THROW
THE TORCH; BE YOURS TO HOLD IT HIGH,
IF YE BREAK FAITH WITH US WHO DIE
WE SHALL NOT SLEEP, THOUGH POPPIES GROW
IN FLANDERS FIELDS.
LT. COL. JOHN McCRAE

TOWNS
GORE BAY
LITTLE CURRENT
ANISHINABEK FIRST NATIONS
COCKBURN ISLAND
SHESHEGWANING
SHEGUIANDAH
SUCKER CREEK
WEST BAY
WHITEFISH RIVER
WIKWEMIKONG

TOWNSHIPS
ALLAN
ASSIGINACK
BARRIE ISLAND
BIDWELL
BILLINGS
BURPEE
CAMPBELL
CARLYLE
CARNARVON
COCKBURN ISLAND
DAWSON
GORDON
HOWLAND
HUMBOLDT
KILLARNEY
MILLS
ROBINSON
RUTHERFORD AND
GEORGE ISLAND
SANDFIELD
SHEGUIANDAH
TEHKUMMAH

WE KNOW THE VALUE OF FREEDOM WHEN WE KNOW THE COSTS
LEST WE FORGET
DEDICATED JUNE 5th 1994


Wall:
MANITOULIN DISTRICT CENOTAPH
THIS SYMBOL OF FREEDOM IS DEDICATED TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN
HONOUR OF THOSE WHOSE SACRIFICE WAS FULL, FINAL AND EVERLASTING.
OUR MEMORIES OF THEM WILL BE FOREVER TREASURED IN ETERNAL
GRATITUDE FOR THEIR GIFT OF LIBERTY, PEACE AND PRIVILEGE.


WORLD WAR I     1914 – 1918
Joseph Adams
 Anwatin
Alexander L. Ballantyne
Benjamin Ballantyne
George Baxter

Harry Beatty
Lawrence Beatty
Percy Beck
Sam Blackburn
Austin W. Blackie
Ernest J. Blackie
Lorne Bradley
Harry W. Brown
Michael Cada
Norman Campbell
William Carr
Isban A. Clark
George W. Collins
Edwin E. Cook
John Cowan
John D. Currie

Jack Elliot
Joseph Enosse
F. Walter Farthing
Amerod Ferguson
Blair Frazer
Joseph C. Gallagher
R. Joseph Good
Augustus Hartung
Victor Hewson
Robert R. Hill
Charles Holmes
Wilfred J. Holmes
John Hughson
Robert Hunter
William Jackman
Alexander G. Jeffery

Edgar Kent
Frank Lavallee
John E. Leach
John Maguire
Harvey C. Marshall
Dave Matheson
John McDonald
John McKeddy
John McMillan
James Merrilees
Ernest Minors
Nelson Minors
Vincent Misinishkotewe
Thomas Moore
Louis J. Norton
Eli Louis Niganiwah

Thomas Niganiwina
Frank Nighswander
James T. Pattison
Andrew Peltier
Percy Pifer
Franklin Proulx
James A. Raynor
W. Leslie Riching
William Rousseau
Lorne Rumley
Lawrence Russell
Clarence Rush
Leslie Scott
William Scott
Colin D. Sims
James F. Valliquette

Michael Wabanosse
Lorne Walker
William Wickett
Arlif R. Wilkin
Alden Wilkinson
Robert Willet
Valentine Wilman
Nelson Young
Joseph Baker

WORLD WAR II     1939 – 1945
Gilbert Alexander
Keith Beange
Kenneth Buck
Les Campbell
Aubrey Chalmers
Richard J. Clark
Dominic Corbiere
Everett Coulter
Hubert Coulter
John A. Eadie
Ivan Falls
Lloyd Fowler
William Fowler

Alphonse Gaiashk
Fredrick G. Green
John C. Halcrow
J. Lloyd Hall
Morland L. Hembruff
Steve R.G. Hilson
James S. Howard
Eric C. Hughson
J. Mac Johnson
Leonard Lehman
Norman F. Lockeyer
Henry Mandamin
Alponse Manitowabi (Korea)
Russell McCraken
Theodore McGregor
Armand McMillian

Leonard Mumford
Charles Nahwegezhic
Roland Nahwegezhic
L. W. Orford
John Ozaomik
Alfred Pitawanakwat
Burt Rogue
Frank Rowe
Wilbert Rowe
Ernest Sagle
Isaac Shawanda
Robert Smeltzer
Russell Stringer
Zoey Trudeau
Lyle Van Horn
Douglas M. Wagg

Clarence Wakegijic
Douglas Weeks
Felix Wemigwans
A. Floyd Williamson
Albert J. Williamson
Douglas Wright













Saturday, 9 September 2017

Lakefield

 
 
Location:  Peterborough County     N 44 25.333   W 78 16.371
Beside the library, in a park bordered by Bridge St., Water St., and Queen St.
 

Construction of this memorial began in 1929, being finished in February 1930, and unveiled on June 1, 1930 to great fanfare in front of throngs of onlookers, family members and supporters.  The names of those who paid the supreme sacrifice in the Great War are forever engraved in the monument made of gray granite from Stanstead, Quebec.  Topped with a Cross of Sacrifice, the memorial was made taller after World War II when an additional layer of granite was added bearing the names of those lost in that conflict.  Once again, another layer was added to honour those lost in Korea and added to this are the names of soldiers lost in peacekeeping duties. 
An excellent account of the dedication ceremony can be found at the Veterans Affairs website:
http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/remembrance/memorials/national-inventory-canadian-memorials/details/5389



Marker text:
Front:
TO THE
GLORY OF GOD
AND
IN MEMORY OF
THOSE WHO MADE
THE
SUPREME SACRIFICE
1914   -   1918

1939 - 1945

1950 - 1953
 




 
Left side:
ARTHUR ALFRED
FRANK ARMSTRONG
JOHN ARMSTRONG
DALLING BARLEE
EDWARD BLOOMFIELD
GORDON CALBERRY
HERBERT CALBERRY
ROLAND CARTER
GORDON CRAWFORD
KEITH CUMBERLAND
BRUCE EDWARDS

ARTHUR FRANKISH
JOHN GORDON
JOHN HALIFAX
ISAAC HAMPTON
GEOFFREY HILLIARD
WILFRED HULL
JOSEPH JAMIESON
THEODORE JOHNSTON
MAXWELL JOHNSTON
STANLEY KIDD
PERCY LEMAY


N. HULL
J. MORRISON
H. STUART

J. CROWE
S. HILL
D. WHITE
E. SMITH

C. HURL
C. BROOKS
L. CHARLTON


NATO
JAMES WOOD
EUGENE PAYNE
RANDY PAYNE
 



 
Right side:
SHERMAN MAHOOD
NOBLE MILBURN
OSBORNE MONTGOMERY
JOHN MORRIS
HERBERT NICHOLLS
LORNE NORTHEY
PHILIP PATRICK
ALEX. PRESTON
GEORGE ROWE
HOWARD ROWE

WILLIAM ROWE
JOSEPH SABATINO
ALLAN SANDERSON
IRA SNELGROVE
GEO. STRICKLAND
R.D. STRICKLAND
HERBERT STUART
J.R. WHITE
ROYDEN WILSON
LEONARD WINGETT


J. COUGHLIN
W. MAROIS
D. LYTLE

B. McFADDEN
A. HOGARTH
A. IRONS

G. TAYLOR
M. BULLOCK
B. BURROWS


P.C. SPENCLEY   KOREA   1950-1953
RONALD EMERY
 



 
Rear:
TO THE
GLORY OF GOD
AND
IN MEMORY OF
THOSE WHO MADE
THE
SUPREME SACRIFICE
1914   -   1918

1939 - 1945

1950 - 1953
 












Saturday, 2 September 2017

Waterdown


 
Location:  City of Hamilton     N 43 20.048   W 79 53.542
At 317 Dundas Street East, in front of the old Memorial Hall, now the Village Theatre.

Memorial Hall was dedicated in a Memorial service on January 14, 1923.  Along with the building, a Memorial Plaque was also unveiled listing the men of Waterdown who served in the First World War, including the names of the nineteen souls who died in the war.
In 1971, a second plaque was added to list the names of those who served and died in the Second World War.  The plaques are found on a stone wall in front of the Memorial Hall.  The wall was dedicated by Royal Canadian Legion Branch 551 and the Lions Club in 1979.  Waterdown was actually part if  Flamborough until an amalgamation in 1974 created the new and quickly expanding town.  In 2001, it was again amalgamated into the City of Hamilton.  Memorial Hall is now home to the Village Theatre.  The list of names is long, as we have seen many times from the rural communities of southern Ontario.

Marker text:
Centre:
WATERDOWN
DISTRICT LIONS
CLUB
CENTENNIAL PROJECT
1979
 



Right:
TO THE HONOUR AND MEMORY
OF OUR BOYS
WHO SERVED IN THE GREAT WAR

1914 - 1918

OUR HEROIC DEAD

ELMER BAKER
ROY BURNETT
WILLIAM BRECKON
WARREN CUTTER
EDWARD CRANE
WILLIAM CRUSOE
CHARLES CARSON
LELAND H. DOUGHERTY
NATHAN A. DOUGHERTY
WURTZ A. EDGE
GEORGE M. FRETWELL
THOMAS FLINTOFF
ACHILIS HERRON
GEORGE A. INKSETTER
RICHARD JAMES
ROY MOUNT
JAMES ROBERTSON
BENJAMIN J. RAYNOR
ARTHUR SAMS
GEORGE TAYLOR

(served)
WILBERT L. ATTRIDGE
GEORGE ARNOLD
ROBERT BUCHAN
MAX BUEZEG
IRVING P. BELL
HAROLD BAKER
GORDON BOWMAN
WILLIAM BOWDEN
LEWIS BEST
WILLIAM CHISOLM
HARRY R. CLARK
SAMUEL COOK
REDVERS CHAFFE
HARRY DAVIDS
BURWELL DENT
JOSEPH C. EAGER
ROY EDGE
OSCAR EDGE
HARRY FEATERSTON
WILLIAM GARDINER

CHARLES GALLIVAN
CHARLES GALLIN
J. HARRY HORNING
OLIVER M. HORNING
RUSSELL HAMILTON
FREDERICK HAYMAN
RICHARD HARBOTTLE
LLOYD M. HENRY
EARL IRELAND
ALBERT JONES
FREDERICK JAMES
JOHN KIRK
WILFRED LANGFORD
FRANK LEAKE
J. ARTHUR MORDEN
ROBERT MEADER
FRANCIS METZGER
ALLAN MUNROE
LORNE MOUNT
PETER MITCHELL
VERNON McFERN

NORMAN McFERN
THOMAS McDONALD
DOUGLAS U. McGREGOR
C. WALKER McGREGOR
GORDON McGREGOR
MARCUS MacKAY
THOMAS NORTON
CHARLES NEWMAN
CLIFFORD NICHOLSON
PERCIVAL PALMER
A. EDGAR RICHARDS
HAROLD C. RICHARDS
WALTER ROCKETT
AUSTIN RUSK
HAZEL RUSK
GORDON V. RYCKMAN
GEORGE SIMPKINS
E. STANLEY SAWELL
HUGH SMILEY
JAMES SIMMONS

RICHARD SEYMOUR
FRANK SPECK
A. STARK
GARTH TASSIE
AUSTIN TUDOR
WILLIAM THOMPSON
ERNEST TODD
CHARLES WOOLLEY
JOHN WOOLLEY
ROY E. WILKINSON
VERNON WILLIS
GEORGE WEBB
WILLIAM WRIGHT
ARYLIE YOUNG

JEAN I. DRUMMOND
AGNES A. FORBES
FLORA McG FRID
B. MURIEL McGREGOR
ETHEL G. RYCKMAN

ERECTED BY THE COMMUNITY LEAGUE  OF THE VILLAGE OF WATERDOWN
 



Left:
1914 - 1918          1939 - 1945

TO THE HONOUR AND MEMORY
OF OUR BOYS
WHO SERVED IN THE GREAT WARS
OUR HEROIC DEAD

H. MURGATROYD
W. BUZZA
J. RUSSELL
M. McILWRAITH
C. HARDING
W. PEGG
F. MacDONALD
M. BAKODY
H. FIRTH
J. DUFFEY
J. PERRINS
L. BOUGHNER
J. ANDERSON
W. CRUDEN
C.S. COOPER
D. McNICHOL
W. McCURDY
R. KEARNS

J.P. OWENS
W. CARR
M. WILLIAMSON
G. BROOKER
G. BAILEY Sr.
A. LEWIS
D. GLASS
B. SAWELL
M. TRATCH
J. DIBLEY
W. BALL
F. HOUSE
F. MacDONALD
B. BOYLE
R. WICKEN
J. HENRY
B. HOUSE
J. CLIFFORD

DRUMMOND
M.T. LILLYCROP
K.C. LINGEN
H. VERVEAKE

S. McKINLEY
R. MEEHAN
A. VANDEWALL
G. MCDERMITT
D. HUNTER
W. WILSON
J. BURNS
A. PLANK
R. MacKAY

F. FITZSIMMONS
E. CASE
P. BALL
W. GRANT
J. BALDWIN
J. JESSON
G. BOND
W. PARKER
D. WARD
A. BONNER
W. MONKHOUSE
S. RANKIN
W. LIVINGSTON
J. WYNNE
H. BENNET
J. HOLMES
W. COLLINS
J. WATSON

L. MacCAN
G. MITCHELL
W. PLACE
M. McLELLAN
A. YOUNG
R. DeMERCHANT
K. BELL
H. RICHMOND
J. OLSON
A. BELL
G. ARNOLD
A. BLISS
S. JOHNS
S. FITZNER
S. MANSLEY
I. MAHER
B. CLUTE
G. TYO

ERECTED BY ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION Br. 551
















Sunday, 27 August 2017

Nairn

 
 

Location:  Middlesex County     N 43 06.718   W 81 33.414
At 4441 Queens Avenue, in front of East Williams Memorial Public School.
 

Also known as the East Williams Cenotaph, this memorial was erected in May of 1922, to honour those from East Williams Township who fought and died in the First World War.  Five more names were added after the Second World War, to honour the brave men lost in that war.
The school in which the memorial stands in front of, was opened in 1952, so I am not sure if the memorial was moved here from another location or this is the original location.



Marker text:
Front:
OUR FALLEN HEROES

LIEUT. THOS. MILLIKEN
CORP. DAVID G. THOMAS
PTE. ALLAN DEWAR
PTE. ANGUS MORRISON
PTE. THOS. E. McANDLESS
PTE. CHARLES McCLAY
PTE. GEORGE ROOKE
REV. JOSEPH ELLIOTT

ERECTED BY THE
TOWNSHIP OF EAST WILLIAMS IN HONOR
OF HER LOYAL SONS WHO SERVED
AND IN LOVING MEMORY OF THOSE
WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE

IN THE GREAT WAR
1914 - 1918
 
 




Right side:
F/O D.M. WITHERSPOON
L/CPL CHANCEY A. JONES
L.A.C. STEWART McEWEN
PTE. R.J. ROBINSON
CPL. LYLE A. McINTOSH

IN LOVING MEMORY OF THOSE WHO
MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE

IN WORLD WAR II
1939 - 1945
 









Saturday, 19 August 2017

Mountain

 

Location:   United Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry
N 45 01.926   W 75 29.941
In Mountain Memorial Park, on the south side of Clark Road. 
 

This memorial is dedicated to the Battle of Hill 70, one of the costliest and hardest fought battles the Canadians would face in WWI.  It was the first battle which was led by Canadian command and remains one of the few battle honours which is only available to Canadian Regiments.  This is the only memorial in Ontario dedicated solely to Hill 70, and today, August 19th, marks the 100th anniversary of that epic victory.
The memorial itself was first erected in 1922 and has since been added to, most notably in 2012 when it underwent a huge restoration and the addition of two black granite stones which tell the story of the Memorial Park and of the Battle of Hill 70.  The descriptions on these stones best articulates the details, so I will let their words continue to tell the story.  A German machine gun, captured at the battle is also part of the display.
A very fitting and fine memorial to the hundreds of soldiers who became casualties of this battle, and to those who carried on the good fight.



Marker text:
Centre stone:
HILL 70
Cote 70

Lest We Forget
Noublions Pas
 

Right flank stone:
1922
 

Left flank stone:
This park is a memorial to 8,677 Canadian casualties in
The Battle of Hill 70
World War 1
August 15 to 25, 1917
An overwhelming victory for the Canadian Corps
 




Mountain Park Stone:
Mountain Memorial
Community Park

     A community meeting was held at Foster's Hall on May 22, 1922
to organize a committee to purchase a 22 acre parcel of land from
Charles Robinson for a park known as Mountain Memorial Community
Park.
     The Trustee board consisted of 7 members- Sam Van Allen, Fred
Barrigar, Robert Bryan, J.R. McGillis, Dr. A. Hoy, Frank Milne and
Sam Workman.
     A subscription canvas was conducted.  Each donor was allowed one
vote for each $5 donated.  Much hard work, time and energy was
given to the project in order to clear, level and seed the north half
of the park to make it a natural playground.  The southern half was
left as a woodlot.
     The Mountain Memorial Community Park was officially opened on
November 12, 1925 when Brigadier General S.W. Hill dedicated a
light as a permanent memorial to the memory of fallen heroesof
Mountain Township in the First World War.  The light, erected on a
tall flagstaff, was installed on a hill designated as "Hill 70" and
constructed in the centre of the park.  The electric current was kindly
donated by N.W. Beach.  The hill commemorates the spot from
which General Sir Arthur Currie conducted his first major operation
as Commander-in-Chief of the Canadian Corps near Lens, France.
A captured German machine gun was also mounted on the hill
     Over the years, neighbouring communities came to enjoy the many
recreational facilities provided at the park.  Hockey matches were
played, skating was enjoyed to band music, carnivals were well-
supported, ball tournaments took place on the softball diamond,
picknickers came to pass a summer's afternoon walking along the
winding cindered path through the shady woods and emerge again
at a rustic pavilion, built by S.W. Van Allen.

Adapted from Tweedsmuir History of Mountain
Compiled by Eva Simms  1969-1979
 
 





Hill 70 Stone:
The Battle of Hill 70
Lens, France
15-18 August, 1917

     The Battle of Hill 70 has been called the forgotten
battle of the First World War of 1914-1918.  Unlike
famous battles in which Canadian soldiers took part,
such as Vimy Ridge and Passchendaele, no monument
has ever been erected to remember what happened
there.  Only in the community of Mountain, Ontario is
there a memorial expressly dedicated to this important
Canadian victory.
     In the summer of 1917, Canadian General Sir Arthur
Currie was promoted and made the General Officer
Commanding of the Canadian Corps of the Canadian
Expeditionary Force.  For the first time, and for the
remainder of the war, all four divisions of the Canadian
Corps would be under Canadian command.
     On July 7, 1917, the British High Command ordered
General Currie and the Canadian Corps to capture the
French city of Lens from its German occupiers.  Seeing
that the city was heavily fortified and easily defended,
General Currie proposed that the Canadians instead
storm Hill 70, the highest ground north of Lens.
     Beginning on August 1, 1917, the Canadian artillery
bombarded the German trenches and defences on and
in the vicinity of Hill 70.  The artillery for the first time
in history aided through real-time observation by radio-
equipped aircraft of the Royal Flying Corps, targeted
the German defensive positions and gun batteries for
two weeks.
     At 4:25 am, on August 15, 1917more than 5,000
Canadian infantrymen of the 1st and 2nd Divisions
went over the top and went forward from their
trenches, preceded by a rolling barrage of shells fired
by over 200 Canadian artillery pieces.  The rapidity
of the Canadian attack took the German defenders
by surprise, and most of the Canadian objectives
were quickly captured.

     Despite heavy enemy artillery fire, including
newly-invented mustard gas shells, the Canadians
consolidated their gains and awaited the German
counterattacks.  Over the next four days and nights,
the Germans would launch attack after attack to try
to push the Canadians off Hill 70.  None succeeded,
as the Canadians tenaciously defended the hill,
despite the sweltering summer heat wave, the
clouds of poison gas, the ceaseless artillery shelling
and the murderous machine gun fire sweeping the
battlefield.  Ammunition and water ran low, and
fighting often was hand-to-hand.  Casualties were
heavy on both sides.  But the Canadians never
relented.
     By the end of August 18, the Germans had been
completely defeated.  No fewer than twenty-one
counterattacks had been fought off.
     This victory cemented the reputation of the
Canadian soldiers as being elite "shock troops"
who were among the best Allied troops to fight
in the war.  The cost was high.  The Canadian Corps
suffered 5,843 casualties during the Battle of Hill
70 including 1,505 killed, 4,297 wounded and 41
taken prisoner.  In all, the Corps suffered 8,677
casualties during the fighting at Lens between
August 15 and 25, 1917.

(a battle map is also shown)
(repeated in French)