Sunday, 15 May 2022

Point Edward

 

Location:  Lambton County     N 42.99597   W -82.41361

Veterans Memorial Park, 206 S.t Clair Street.

 

 

This tall memorial was erected in 1922 by the citizens of Point Edward to remember the fallen in the Great War.  The carved stone bust of a soldier was carved by a local artist.  The monument was opened to great fanfare by Governor General Lord Julian Byng, who had commanded Canadian troops at the famous Battle of Vimy Ridge.  The names of the fallen from the Great War can be found on plaques at the base of the memorial and the names of the battles can be seen rising up the sides of the stone pillar.  There is also a bell with plaques that also pays tribute to the fallen of World War II and Korea.  A recently planted Vimy Oak also stands proudly over-looking the park, complete with its own sign.

A memorial dedicated to the Canadian Merchant Navy is also found in the Veterans Memorial Park, which I will feature in a separate post.


Marker text:

Front:

YPRES

HOOGE

ST. ELOI

VIMY RIDGE

BOURLON WOOD

SACTUARY WOOD


THIS MEMORIAL

WAS ERECTED BY THE CITIZENS OF

POINT EDWARD

THROUGH VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTIONS

TO THE HONOURED HEROES

WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE

IN THE GREAT WAR

1914 - 1918

LEST WE FORGET

THEIR NAMES SHALL LIVE FOREVER


THIS STONE WAS LAID

BY

LORD JULIAN BYNG

OF VIMY

GOVERNOR GENERAL OF CANADA

APRIL 18th, 1922

 

 

 


Right side:

DOUAI

HILL 70

ARLEUX

FRESNOY

VALENCIENNES

QUEANT DROCOURT


KILLED IN ACTION

RANDALL ROBERT

SEAGER FREDERICK

SKINNER WILLIAM BRUCE

SLATER BENJAMIN

TAYLOR ERNEST

VOLLICK HENRY HERBERT

WALKER KENNETH

WILLIAMS MORRIS

WALKER FRANK

FERNS PERCY

HOWELL ARTHUR

 


 

 

Back:

MONS

DENAIN

GIVINCHY

FESTUBERT

PASSCHENDAELE

NEUVE CHAPPELLE


DIED DURING MILITARY SERVICE 

OR THROUGH MILITARY SERVICE

KNIGHT, RICHAR R.

EVANS, THOMAS H.

BROWN, JAMES GORDON

MAVITTY, JOHN


THE STONE IN THIS

MEMORIAL WAS DONATED 

BY THE

CENTRAL CANADA STONE CO. LTD.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Left side:

LENS

SOMME

AMIENS

CAMBRIA

CANAL-DU-NORD

MONCHY-LE-PREUX

 

KILLED IN ACTION

BENWARE NEIL

CLARKE WILLIAM

FORSYTHE ROBERT

FAIR ROY

GRACEY AUBREY WILLIAM

HAMBLETON GEORGE

HOWIE MORLEY

KEMMLE CHARLES

McRURY ANGUS

PLUMBRIDGE THOMAS

 

 

 

 

 

Bell:

THIS PLAQUE IS ERECTED

IN HONOUR OF

THE VETERANS OF

THE KOREAN WAR

1950 - 1953

 

 

THIS PARK DONATED TO

POINT EDWARD BY

CARL C. MANORE

IN MEMORY OF HIS PARENTS

MR. AND MRS. C.C. MANORE

LONG TIME RESIDENTS OF THE VILLAGE. 

 


DEDICATED 

TO THE MEN AND WOMEN OF THIS COMMUNITY

WHO SERVED IN

WORLD WAR II

1939 - 1945


KILLED IN ACTION

ALBERT F. BENDALL

JACK BURGESS

ROSS CLARK

ROBERT S. HADLEY

GEORGE HOPWOOD











 



Saturday, 7 May 2022

Petawawa - General Frederick Gate

 

Location:  Renfrew County     N 45.90720   W -77.28775

At the main entrance to CFB Petawawa, 44 Menin Road.

 

This memorial is dedicated to the memory of Major-General Robert T. Frederick (1907-1970) of the U.S. Army, who commanded the 1st Special Service Force, more commonly known as the Devil's Brigade.  The history and exploits of this unique and effective Canadian/US commando unit can be found in movies and books that will tell an impressive story of bravery and bold military achievement during World War II.  

The location of this memorial, at the front gate to CFB Petawawa, is appropriately placed as this base carries on the traditions and battle honours of the 1st Special Service Force, which was home to the Canadian Airborne Regiment and the Special Service Force.

The famous red shoulder patch can also be found on the memorial.  Gen. Frederick was also instrumental is helping to design the V42 Combat Knife, used by these same special forces and whose profile can be seen in the crests of the U.S. Special Forces and Canada's JTF2.



 

Marker text:

MAJOR-GENERAL
ROBERT TRYON FREDERICK

MGEN ROBERT T. FREDERICK, U.S. ARMY (1907-1970)
ORGANIZED AND LED THE ELITE WORLD WAR II JOINT
CANADIAN-AMERICAN FIRST SPECIAL SERVICE FORCE,
WHICH GAINED AN OUTSTANDING AND DISTINGUISHED HISTORY
IN THE PACIFIC, ITALY AND FRANCE.
FORCEMEN WERE HIGHLY AND UNIQUELY TRAINED,
INCLUDING PARACHUTING AND SKIING. FREDERICK BECAME
THE YOUNGEST MAJOR-GENERAL IN THE U.S. ARMY
AND WAS WOUNDED EIGHT TIMES.
BATTLE HONOURS OF THE FORCE ARE CARRIED IN CANADA BY THE
CANADIAN AIRBORNE REGIMENT OF THE SPECIAL SERVICE FORCE,
AND IN THE UNITED STATES BY THE 1ST SPECIAL FORCES
REGIMENT.

MAJOR GÉNÉRAL
ROBERT TRYON FREDERICK

MGEN ROBERT T. FREDERICK, ARMÉE É.U. (1907-1970)
A ORGANISÉ ET COMMANDÉ LA 1ÉRE
FORCE DES OPÉRATIONS SPÉCIALES,
UNE UNITÉ D’ÉLITE FORMÉE DE CANADIENS ET D’AMÉRICAINS
QUI S’EST COUVERTE DE GLOIRE DANS LE PACIFIQUE,
EN ITALIE ET EN FRANCE.
LES HOMMES DE LA FORCE, ÉTAIENT DES EXPERTS EN
PARACHUTISME ET EN SKI. FREDERICK EST DEVENU LE PLUS JEUNE
MAJOR-GÉNÉRAL DE L’ARMÉE É.U.
IL A ÉTÉ BLESSÉ HUIT FOIS.
LES HONNEURS DE BATAILLES DE LA FORCE SONT PORTÉS PAR
LE RÉGIMENT AÉROPORTÉ DU CANADA DE LA
FORCE DES OPÉRATIONS SPÉCIALES,
ET AUX ÉTATS-UNIS PAR LE 1ER RÉGIMENT DES FORCES SPÉCIALES. 


Small plaque:
DEDICATED IN THE PRESENCE OF
DÉDIÉ EN PRÉSENCE DE

BGEN I.C. DOUGLAS, CD, COMMANDER SPECIAL SERVICE FORCE
COL JESSE L. JOHNSON (US ARMY),
COMMANDER 10TH SPECIAL FORCES GROUP (ABN)
MR. J. RED SUMMERSIDES,
CANADIAN VICE-PRESIDENT FSSF ASSOCIATION
ON THIS 9 SEPTEMBER 1988 












Sunday, 1 May 2022

Thorold - Battle of Beaver Dams

 

Location:  Niagara Region     N 43.12286   W -79.20155

In Battle of Beaver Dams Park, just off Sullivan Avenue, east of Front Street.

 

The following article is taken from The Canadian Encyclopedia, written by Jason Ridler, October 2011.

Battle of Beaver Dams

One of the more controversial battles of the War of 1812, the Battle of Beaver Dams established the importance of the guile, professional soldiering, Aboriginal warfare and luck involved in British victory. It occurred during the "see-saw" battles of 1813, in which American forces sought to press their victories on Canadian soil after the successful capture of Fort George in May 1813. On 24 June 1813, almost 500 American troops under Lieutenant-Colonel Charles G. Boerstler were sent from Fort George to harass and encounter Brigadier General Vincent's advanced post near Beaver Dams. Stationed there was one company of the 49th Foot, under the command of Lieutenant James FitzGibbon. However, a late start and loose talk among Boerstler's men sowed the seeds of Boerstler's defeat.

Advanced Warning to James FitzGibbon

Laura Secord, a Queenston housewife whose husband had been injured during the Battle of Queenston Heights, overheard talk regarding the upcoming American attack. With her husband ailing, Secord trekked over 30 km toward Beaver Dams to warn the British troops, allegedly passing through American lines and at great risk to her safety, until she encountered an Aboriginal camp where she found a guide to lead her the rest of the way. Secord warned FitzGibbon, but since she had no specifics on the advancing US forces, FitzGibbon waited for more information. On the 24th, Aboriginal scouts reported the American advance to Captain Dominique Ducharme of the Indian Department. He sent word to FitzGibbon, and the ambush was on. To his great regret, Boerstler was aware that the Aboriginals had spotted him, but pressed on with his advance.

The Battle of Beaver Dams

A party of 300 Caughnawaga attacked the Americans from the rear along an enclosed, wooded section of the trail near Beaver Dams [Thorold, Ont]. They were soon joined by 100 Mohawk warriors led by Captain William Kerr. After three hours of firing at shadows, the American forces were ready to surrender, but feared what Aboriginal soldiers might do to them as prisoners. FitzGibbon arrived with 50 soldiers of his own 49th Regiment. According to FitzGibbon, he was able to begin the process of surrender in part because of the terror the Aboriginal soldiers had instilled in the Americans, and in part because he had persuaded Boerstler that his own force of fewer than 50 regulars was simply the vanguard of a larger British contingent lurking behind the trees and that, if the fighting continued, it might be impossible to control the savagery of the warriors. Still, it was only when Major P. W. De Haren of the 104th Regiment arrived with large reinforcements that a surrender was formally reached, and by De Haren himself. When the dust settled, 5 Aboriginal chiefs and warriors were said to have been killed, and 20-25 wounded. The Americans suffered 25 dead and 50 injured, including the commander, Boerstler.

Aftermath of the Battle of Beaver Dams

It was later generally accepted that "the Cognawaga Indians fought the battle, the Mohawks or Six Nations got the plunder, and FitzGibbon got the credit," a slogan attributed to Mohawk leader John Norton, who had fought at Beaver Dams. But FitzGibbon himself noted that the credit that was his due was in seizing an opportunity for using fear, not bullets, rooted in the successful guerilla tactics of the Aboriginal forces. He wrote, "With respect to the affair with Captain (sic) Boerstler, not a shot was fired on our side by any but the Indians. They beat the American detachment into a state of terror, and the only share I claim is taking advantage of a favourable moment to offer them protection from the tomahawk and scalping knife. The Indian Department did the rest." Along with their defeat at Stoney Creek three weeks earlier, the Battle of Beaver Dams left the Americans convinced that they could not safely venture from the protected confines of Fort George, and it led directly to the dismissal of the ailing Major General Henry Dearborn, commander of US forces in Upper Canada, by US Secretary of War John Armstrong.

The controversy remains over how much credit for victory should be given to the Aboriginal or British leadership, as well as on how exactly Secord came to hear of the impending American attack. She herself would write many versions of both how she heard of the danger, and how she made her trek, some including the idea of bringing a milk cow and acting as if she was conducting farm business to act as a cover for her true intentions. Regardless, Secord's trek contributed to a decisive British victory in the battle of Beaver Dams. 

 

Today, the area is marked with several plaques and stones to commemorate the battle and those involved, as well as several other markers not related to the battle, but of local significance. 

 



Marker Text:

National Historic Site plaque:

BEAVER DAMS

Following their repulse at Stoney Creek the Americans sent a 

force from Fort George to destroy a British advanced post at 

Beaver Dams. Warned of their approach by an Indian scout 

and by Laura Secord, a force of Iroquois from Caughnawaga 

and the Grand River, led by Captains Dominique Ducharme 

and William Kerr, ambushed the attackers near here on 24 

June 1813, and compelled them to surrender to Lieutenant 

James Fitzgibbon of the regular British army. After this defeat 

the Americans did not again venture out in force, leaving the 

British in control of the area. 

 

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada

 

 

 

 

Laura Secord plaque:

LAURA INGERSOLL SECORD

1775 - 1868

WHO SET OUT FROM HER HOME IN QUEENS-

TON EARLY IN THE MORNING OF JUNE 22,

1813, TO WALK AND ARDUOUS NINETEEN MIL-

ES TO WARN THE BRITISH OUTPOST AT DE

CEW FALLS OF AN IMPENDING AMERICAN

ATTACK.  THE INFORMATION ENABLED THE

LOCAL BRITISH COMMANDER, LIEUTENANT

JAMES FITZGIBBON, AND HIS DETACHMENT

TO SURPRISE AND CAPTURE THE ENTIRE EN-

EMY FORCE AT THE BATTLE OF BEAVER DAMS

ON JUNE 24, 1813, THEREBY MARKING THE 

TURNING POINT IN THE WAR OF 1812.

TO PERPETUATE HER MEMORY.