Monday 28 August 2023

Ottawa - National Aboriginal Veterans Memorial

 

Location:  City of Ottawa     N 45.42156   W -75.69320

At the east side of Confederation Park, 100 Elgin Street.

Taken from www.veterans.gc.ca:

"On June 21, 2001, on the occasion of National Aboriginal Day (now known as National Indigenous Peoples Day), a national monument to the Indigenous Veterans was unveiled in Ottawa. The unveiling is the result of the hard work and perseverance of the National Aboriginal Veterans Association (NAVA), the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples and Senator Nick Taylor.

Sculptor and painter Lloyd Pinay of the Peepeekisis First Nation in Saskatchewan designed the Monument which is reflective of all Indigenous peoples in Canada: First Nations, M├ętis and Inuit. Lloyd Pinay can trace his heritage to Plains Ojibway, Plains Cree and Sioux origins. His dad was a Second World War Veteran and was severely wounded towards the end of the war.

The richly symbolic sculpture represents the stories of thousands of men and women who have played a decisive role in defending the freedom of our country. It symbolizes the strength of the Indigenous peoples' beliefs as drawn from the natural world around them. The artist makes frequent use of the number four, which has spiritual importance for many Indigenous peoples. The four warriors (two men and two women), which represent the diversity of First Nations, Metis and Inuit people, are facing the four cardinal directions.

The four animal figures are spirit guides associated with qualities that are admired by Indigenous cultures: the elk, for its sharp senses, the buffalo, for its tenacity, the bear, for its healing powers and the wolf, for its family values. A triumphant eagle is perched at the top of the sculpture. It represents the Creator (known as Thunderbird), and embodies the spirit of the Indigenous peoples of Canada.

The artist has conveyed a sense of balance by representing opposites: two predators and two prey, two women and two men, two weapons and two spiritual objects — the eagle feather fan and the peace pipe. Through this work, Pinay expresses the idea that the desire for peace often lies at the root of war.

The upper portion of the piece is made of bronze. A brown patina was applied to the entire monument while certain portions had an application of a patina to give it a gold sheen. The base is a piece of diamond brown stone from a quarry in Shawinigan."

 

 

Marker text:

TO ABORIGINAL WAR VETERANS
IN CANADA AND TO THOSE THAT
HAVE FALLEN

This monument is raised in sacred and everlasting honour
of the contributions of all Aboriginal Canadians in war and
peacekeeping operations.

Many thousands of Aboriginal people saw action and endured hardship
in the First and Second World Wars and the Korean War. They served with
honour and distinction in all branches of the service and in every rank
and appointment from Private to Brigadier. They fought overseas to defend
the sovereignty and liberty of allied nations, in addition to supporting the
cause at home. Their dedication continues in peacekeeping operations
in faraway lands.

Their heroic acts earned many decorations for bravery as well as the respect
and enduring friendship of their comrades in arms. Hundreds from across
Canada gave fully of their lives so that all Canadians might know peace and
inherit freedom.
    
We who would follow in their path are humbled by the magnitude of their
sacrifice and inspired by the depths of their resolve. We owe them a debt
of gratitude we cannot soon hope to repay.

Unveiled by Her Excellency the Right Honourable Adrienne Clarkson, C.C., C.M.M.,
C.D. Governor General of Canada and Commander-in-Chief of the Canadian
Forces on June 21, 2001, National Aboriginal Day.

This monument was made possible by the National Aboriginal Veterans Association and the
generous donations of the Canadian people.

Artist : Noel Lloyd Pinay

NATIONAL ABORIGINAL VETERANS ASSOCIATION
ASSOCIATION NATIONALE
DES ANCIENS COMBATTANTS AUTOCHTONES

 







 

Thursday 24 August 2023

Owen Sound - Greenwood Cemetery

 

Location:  Grey County     N 44.54759   W -80.94275

On the south side of town, between 4th Avenue West and 2nd Avenue East.

The Greenwood cemetery is the final resting place of several men and women who served our country in the Armed Forces.  The traditional military gravemarkers can be found throughout the cemetery.  Among the many stones are the graves of three WWI heroes who were awarded the Victoria Cross for Valour.  

There is also a large monument to honour members of the International Order of Odd Fellows (IOOF) who died during WWI.  The Monument was constructed in 1919.  It was constructed with field stones from local farmers’ fields and is 35 ft. tall. In 2011, it was part of a restoration project with funds provided through
a grant from the Department of Veterans Affairs.  The monument is found centrally located in the cemetery, just north of the mausoleum.

Few cemeteries have three Victoria Cross recipients interred within their grounds as Greenwood Cemetery became the final resting place for William Avery ‘Billy’ Bishop V.C., Thomas William Holmes V.C. and David Vivian Currie V.C. In comparison, twelve Victoria Cross recipients were interred at the United Kingdom’s Brookwood Cemetery which is located near London. 

If you plan to visit the cemetery and wish to find these graves, then I would suggest using the following link to tour the grounds and find several other worthwhile points of interest.

 https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/7fd97fe46532462ebb87fc2d1f00d646

 


Marker Text:

IOOF Cenotaph:

IN LOVING MEMORY

OF

THOMAS ALLEN

COLIN STANLEY CAMPBELL

GEORGE ARTHUR EWENS

DOUGLAS ARCHIBALD HAY

ROY BROWN McKENZIE

WESLEY CLARENCE McFAUL

CHARLES EDWARD ORFORD

ROBERT POLLOCK

JOHNATHAN RENNIE

JAMES THOMSON ROBB

GREGOR McKENZIE YOUNG


MEMBERS OF

OWEN SOUND LODGE NO. 180

HOME LODGE NO. 441

WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN THE CAUSE

OF FREEDOM IN THE GREAT WAR

1914 - 1918

ERECTED BY I.O.O.F. AND REBEKAHS

  

 

 














Saturday 19 August 2023

Toronto - York Township

 

Location:  City of Toronto     N 43.68998   W -79.47758

At 40 Municipal Drive, just north of Eglinton Avenue, near the York Civic Centre.

This cenotaph was erected to honour the men and women from York Township, who gave their lives for King and Country.  The grey granite memorial stands on a busy lane near the York Civic Centre, the hub for the area.  Once upon a time, this community was distant from the hustle and bustle of the big city, now it has become part of the huge city of Toronto.  The smaller stone seen in the photos beside the memorial is a cenotaph.

Market text:

TO THE GLORY OF GOD

AND IN LOVING MEMORY

OF THE MEN AND WOMEN OF THE

TOWNSHIP OF YORK WHO GAVE

THEIR LIVES FOR KING AND COUNTRY

IN THE CAUSE OF

FREEDOM AND DEMOCRACY


1914 - 1918

1939 - 1945

1950 - 1953